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November 10, 2011 | By Matt Pais and RedEye movie critic
**** (out of four) The stunningly beautiful, remarkably powerful film from writer-director Lars Von Trier bears plenty in common with “The Tree of Life,” if “Tree” were an extraordinary vision of flawed human behavior in the context of a fragile world. You know, rather than a repetitive rumination on how pretty trees are and how much kids are - thanks, Capt. Obvious - influenced by their parents. As “Melancholia” opens, Von Trier presents gorgeous images of people like Justine (Kirsten Dunst, excellent)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | Matt Pais, @mattpais and RedEye movie critic
*** (out of four) This is a rule, not a suggestion: If you want to see “Nymphomaniac Vol. II,” first you have to see “Nymphomaniac Vol. I.” It's not like skipping the first “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” and picking up with “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze.” I immediately regret that last title in the context of this review. Sorry. No, to take in the final half of writer/director Lars von Trier's four-hour exploration of unyielding desire, you must see the setup: when Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | Matt Pais, @mattpais and RedEye movie critic
*** (out of four) We'll get to Shia later. First: "That's completely unacceptable," notes Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg) after confessing that for many years she used her womanly powers without concern for others. "If you have wings," replies Seligman (Stellan Skarsgard), who gave shelter to the woman he found beaten and bloody on the ground, "why not fly?" Throughout writer-director Lars Von Trier's "Nymphomaniac Vol. 1," characters attempt to contextualize sexuality with society, music and nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | Matt Pais, @mattpais and RedEye movie critic
*** (out of four) We'll get to Shia later. First: "That's completely unacceptable," notes Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg) after confessing that for many years she used her womanly powers without concern for others. "If you have wings," replies Seligman (Stellan Skarsgard), who gave shelter to the woman he found beaten and bloody on the ground, "why not fly?" Throughout writer-director Lars Von Trier's "Nymphomaniac Vol. 1," characters attempt to contextualize sexuality with society, music and nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | Matt Pais, @mattpais and RedEye movie critic
*** (out of four) This is a rule, not a suggestion: If you want to see “Nymphomaniac Vol. II,” first you have to see “Nymphomaniac Vol. I.” It's not like skipping the first “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” and picking up with “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze.” I immediately regret that last title in the context of this review. Sorry. No, to take in the final half of writer/director Lars von Trier's four-hour exploration of unyielding desire, you must see the setup: when Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2012 | Matt Pais and RedEye movie critic
At Sunday's Oscar ceremony, the Muppets aren't performing. "Drive"was snubbed in seemingly every category. And one of the most awful, insulting movies of 2011 is up for Best Picture. That's a triple. Freaking. Whammy. So I'm thrilled to turn the frown upside down and say that "The Artist," the only great movie nominated for Best Picture, will take home several of the night's biggest awards. With that, let's check in on the front-runner, the next-strongest competitor and more for the big-ticket categories.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | Matt Pais, @mattpais and RedEye movie critic
For his breakout documentary “Super Size Me,” Morgan Spurlock ate nothing but McDonald's for 30 days. For his concert doc “One Direction: This Is Us,” the filmmaker listened to nothing but the boy band while following and filming Harry, Zayn, Niall, Liam and Louis for six months. How do those two experiences compare? “It's addictive,” says Spurlock with a laugh. “Once it gets in your brain it doesn't go away. I can't tell you how many nights I woke up singing One Direction songs.” To most people who aren't teenage...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2011 | By Matt Pais and RedEye movie critic
**** (out of four) The stunningly beautiful, remarkably powerful film from writer-director Lars Von Trier bears plenty in common with “The Tree of Life,” if “Tree” were an extraordinary vision of flawed human behavior in the context of a fragile world. You know, rather than a repetitive rumination on how pretty trees are and how much kids are - thanks, Capt. Obvious - influenced by their parents. As “Melancholia” opens, Von Trier presents gorgeous images of people like Justine (Kirsten Dunst, excellent)
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