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November 10, 2011 | By Matt Pais and RedEye movie critic
**** (out of four) The stunningly beautiful, remarkably powerful film from writer-director Lars Von Trier bears plenty in common with “The Tree of Life,” if “Tree” were an extraordinary vision of flawed human behavior in the context of a fragile world. You know, rather than a repetitive rumination on how pretty trees are and how much kids are - thanks, Capt. Obvious - influenced by their parents. As “Melancholia” opens, Von Trier presents gorgeous images of people like Justine (Kirsten Dunst, excellent)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | Matt Pais, @mattpais and RedEye movie critic
Negative five stars (out of four) An instant landmark of crap, “Upside Down” begins with an interminable voiceover as Adam (the permanently earnest Jim Sturgess of “Cloud Atlas”) utters, “The universe is so full of wonders,” and, “Gravity. They say you can't fight it. Well, I disagree. What if love was stronger than gravity?” Before you can start singing “Defying Gravity” from “Wicked,” the epically dreadful sci-fi/romance “Upside Down” becomes a black hole of pretentious self-parody.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | Matt Pais, @mattpais and RedEye movie critic
Negative five stars (out of four) An instant landmark of crap, “Upside Down” begins with an interminable voiceover as Adam (the permanently earnest Jim Sturgess of “Cloud Atlas”) utters, “The universe is so full of wonders,” and, “Gravity. They say you can't fight it. Well, I disagree. What if love was stronger than gravity?” Before you can start singing “Defying Gravity” from “Wicked,” the epically dreadful sci-fi/romance “Upside Down” becomes a black hole of pretentious self-parody.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2011 | By Matt Pais and RedEye movie critic
**** (out of four) The stunningly beautiful, remarkably powerful film from writer-director Lars Von Trier bears plenty in common with “The Tree of Life,” if “Tree” were an extraordinary vision of flawed human behavior in the context of a fragile world. You know, rather than a repetitive rumination on how pretty trees are and how much kids are - thanks, Capt. Obvious - influenced by their parents. As “Melancholia” opens, Von Trier presents gorgeous images of people like Justine (Kirsten Dunst, excellent)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2014 | By Curt Wagner, @ShowPatrol and RedEye
The latest teaser sketch for Season 4 of "Portlandia" takes both statement art and McDonald's to task. In "Anti-Corporate Student Art," Fred Armisen plays a Portland Community College art teacher asking his students to stick it to big business by painting Ronald McDonald in a thought-provoking way. "Ronald McDonald," he says, "plus something violent and crazy like money equals shock. Shock me. " He asks the model dressed as Ronald McDonald, who happens to be his wife, to pose in a gas mask, with a gun, in an attack position and other frightening poses.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | Matt Pais, @mattpais and RedEye movie critic
**1/2 (out of four) Smash together “Inception,” “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” and “The Thomas Crown Affair” with director Danny Boyle's (“Slumdog Millionaire”) typically pulsing style, and what do you get? Overstimulated, that's what. In the engrossing and silly heist thriller “Trance,” art auctioneer Simon (James McAvoy) can't seem to remember where he left a valuable painting. For good reason: During a robbery, Simon stashed the painting somewhere safe, but the subsequent head-bashing from lead criminal Frank...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2012 | By Dana Moran and RedEye
Think the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, is all about snooty celebs sipping wine in hot tubs at snooty ski resorts while screening snooty art flicks? Well, it's a little bit about that. But Sundance also is the fest that premiered buzz-worthy 2011 movies such as "Another Earth," "Like Crazy," "Martha Marcy May Marlene" and Chicago's own "The Interrupters. " We've got five reasons to keep an eye on this year's fest, which runs through Sunday. damoran@tribune.com | @redeyedana 1 -- Everybody who's anybody is there Seriously, it's like...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By Dana Moran and RedEye
By now, you've hopefully read the entire "Hunger Games" book series. If not, a) What are you waiting for? It takes like five hours! and b) Don't worry, we're not going to spoil the plot of the second book, "Catching Fire," for you. But we will tell you that wild rumors have been flying for days over the casting of a big new character, human Adonis Finnick Odair. Robert Pattinson reportedly is out of the running, but eonline.com says Armie Hammer, Taylor Kitsch and Garrett Hedlund are in contention.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By Dana Moran and RedEye
If you're an A-list megastar (Beyonce), your bio doc is aired on HBO. But if you're Ke$ha, you get MTV. The $-list pop star will send fans behind the scenes of her life in "Ke$ha: My Crazy Beautiful Life," which kicks off in April. Shot over two years, the show "follows Ke$ha as she navigates the drama and madness of both her personal and professional live, traveling the globe and recording her 'Warrior' album," according to MTV. Never mind the fact that she obviously stole the title from the 2001 Kirsten Dunst movie -- what can Ke$ha learn from other celeb reality series?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | Matt Pais, @mattpais and RedEye movie critic
*1/2 (out of four) Perhaps the sight of Bella - er, Kristen Stewart - in the buff will attract people to “On the Road.” Or they'll flock to it merely because they're curious to see how Jack Kerouac's self-indulgent 1957 novel translates to the screen. Answer: It can't, and it doesn't. Sure, the “Motorcycle Diaries” pair of director Walter Salles and writer Jose Rivera gets the story going faster than Kerouac. Then they take it nowhere. Sal (Sam Riley) immediately admires Dean (Garrett Hedlund)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2011 | By Matt Pais and RedEye movie critic
When the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) announced its 2011 nominations this morning , a few things ran through my mind that I'd like to ask the voters (politely, of course): 1. Do you really think Jonah Hill's sidekick role in "Moneyball," which merely required the actor to be quieter and less obnoxious, contributed more to the story than Albert Brooks' softly chilling villain in "Drive," a marvel of simmering menace? In the battle between "funny guy becomes low-impact supporting player" and "funny guy becomes one of the year's most memorable bad guys," I'll take the killer.
EMAILSTORY
December 15, 2011 | By Matt Pais and RedEye movie critic
Allow me to begin my take on this morning's Golden Globe nominations with a sigh of relief: the extremely shallow, incredibly exploitative assumed Oscar contender "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," one of the worst movies of the year , received zero nominations. None. Not, as some predicted, for Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor (Max Von Sydow) or Best Supporting Actress (Sandra Bullock). Well done, Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Now that I got that off my chest, some other thoughts: -- "The Artist"...
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