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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2011 | By Matt Pais and RedEye movie critic
*** (out of four) Which documentarian but Werner Herzog would prompt a reverend, who has been speaking in a cemetery about both executions and how much he enjoys seeing animals roaming a golf course, “Please describe an encounter with a squirrel”? Herzog (“Cave of Forgotten Dreams,” “Grizzly Man”) has a natural curiosity for life's odd, mysterious details. It's life's mysteries concerning truth, death and rehabilitation, he posits in “Into the Abyss,” that render the death penalty unjust.
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NEWS
August 29, 2013 | By Courtney Griffin and RedEye
Like many college students, Blair Brettschneider, a graduate of the University of Miami, admits that just a few years ago her future seemed rather uncertain. “I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life,” said Brettschneider, a Michigan native who studied journalism. She contemplated possibly writing for a magazine, or better yet, starting a magazine of her own - a self-described “smart” publication for girls (“I was sick of looking at prom dresses,” she said). But just two short years later, Brettschneider is far from the magazine business - instead, at the...
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2012 | By Erin Gibbons and For RedEye
After 10 years in the kitchen at Wave in the W Chicago Lakeshore, Kristine Subido is teaming up with her mother to open a casual counter-service spot that focuses on bringing an unfamiliar cuisine to life through one very familiar ingredient. “As common as chicken is, Filipino food is not that common [in this country],” she said. “If you ask the average person what Filipino food is, nobody can really tell you. Even Filipinos have a hard time explaining it.” At Pecking Order, scheduled to open in early summer by the intersection of Clark Street and Montrose Avenue, Subido will serve...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2012 | By Erin Gibbons and For RedEye
After 10 years in the kitchen at Wave in the W Chicago Lakeshore, Kristine Subido is teaming up with her mother to open a casual counter-service spot that focuses on bringing an unfamiliar cuisine to life through one very familiar ingredient. “As common as chicken is, Filipino food is not that common [in this country],” she said. “If you ask the average person what Filipino food is, nobody can really tell you. Even Filipinos have a hard time explaining it.” At Pecking Order, scheduled to open in early summer by the intersection of Clark Street and Montrose Avenue, Subido will serve...
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | By Courtney Griffin and RedEye
Like many college students, Blair Brettschneider, a graduate of the University of Miami, admits that just a few years ago her future seemed rather uncertain. “I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life,” said Brettschneider, a Michigan native who studied journalism. She contemplated possibly writing for a magazine, or better yet, starting a magazine of her own - a self-described “smart” publication for girls (“I was sick of looking at prom dresses,” she said). But just two short years later, Brettschneider is far from the magazine business - instead, at the...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | Matt Pais, @mattpais and RedEye movie critic
*** (out of four) Many music fans and writers trip over themselves trying to predict the industry's next big trend. Genres are invented. Hype emerges and disappears. But rarely does something as chilling come along as narco corridos, Mexican songs glamorizing drug cartels' ruthless violence that the killers play after executions. Director Shaul Schwarz's shocking and upsetting documentary "Narco Cultura" addresses this increasingly popular subculture, and it won't be easy to forget the image of a venue packed with concertgoers singing in...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2012 | Matt Pais and RedEye movie critic
** (out of four) After revealing multiple forms of intolerance and the vast majority of his body in the hilarious “Borat” and fearlessly uneven “Bruno,” Sacha Baron Cohen apparently has nothing left to expose. That could be why the comedian's latest film seemingly exists to build up to one big joke, which should be news to nobody: That dictatorships - where a small group of people possess all the wealth and certain races disproportionately occupy prison space and women must constantly defend their rights - could see familiar...
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | Stephen Markley
Color me impressed. In a year when it seemed virtually impossible for a weirder sports story to appear than the Manti Te'o catfish girlfriend, '90s relic Dennis Rodman gets on a plane to visit North Korea. Just a month into 2013, the Te'o scandal seemed virtually unbeatable. The guy had a mortal lock on the most bizarre ESPN-MSM-TMZ crossover superstory of the year, and then only a month later The Worm nabs a state dinner and media tour with dictator and apparent basketball fan Kim Jong Un, whose brother was once photographed wearing a...
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | Stephen Markley
At the risk of upsetting the fanboys, I have to go on record and explain why the final film in Chris Nolan's Batman trilogy is a disappointment of epic proportions. Rotten Tomatoes had to turn off their comment section because people were so upset about negative reviews, but look, guys, it ain't rocket science: “The Dark Knight Rises” is not a very good movie - and it's especially not a very good movie by the standards Nolan set for himself with “Batman Begins” and “The Dark Knight.” Let me begin with the caveat that superhero films are rarely good.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2013 | By Curt Wagner, @ShowPatrol and RedEye
"Mob City" tells the story of Los Angeles gangsters in 1947, but Chicago's mob history helped Milo Ventimiglia create his character in Frank Darabont's miniseries. "It's funny. I kind of went back to stories and things that I heard from my father in Chicago," Ventimiglia said during a recent interview, adding that his father's side of the family came from Chicago Heights in thye south suburbs. The actor grew up listening to his dad's tales of the city's gangster past and used those stories to help fill in the blanks about attorney Ned Stax, one of the...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2011 | By Matt Pais and RedEye movie critic
*** (out of four) Which documentarian but Werner Herzog would prompt a reverend, who has been speaking in a cemetery about both executions and how much he enjoys seeing animals roaming a golf course, “Please describe an encounter with a squirrel”? Herzog (“Cave of Forgotten Dreams,” “Grizzly Man”) has a natural curiosity for life's odd, mysterious details. It's life's mysteries concerning truth, death and rehabilitation, he posits in “Into the Abyss,” that render the death penalty unjust.
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