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How not to job hunt

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April 16, 2012|By Mick Swasko, RedEye

It's not that you shouldn't ask for some parental help on the job search, it's a matter of using common sense. Experts say asking for some help from home can even be a good thing, but there are some serious do's and don'ts for looping in Mom and Dad. Emily Zorza of OfficeTeam, a administrative staffing and office support recruiter with offices in Chicago, lays it out.

DO: Conduct mock interviews with parents to practice responses to common questions. Zorza says this can both make potential helicopter parents feel involved without interfering while still helping prepare a candidate for the interview process.

DON'T: Let your parents sit in on interviews or follow up with hiring managers. This gives a hiring manager a sense that a candidate doesn't really care much for the position. Instead, candidates should do it themselves. "It would give the hiring manager the sense that you are actually interested in the position and show your strengths in communication and independence," she said.

DO:  Leverage your parents' networking contacts to learn about job opportunities. An introduction on LinkedIn or emailing a colleague or a friend asking if they know anyone in the network isn't over the line, especially in a competitive job market.

DON'T: Let your parents take ownership of your career. "It's important for [candidates] to stick to a path," she said. Don't feel pressured to take a job just because of parental pressure, or because their connections got an interview.

DO: Ask your parents to review your resume and cover letter.

DON'T: Have your parents submit a job application on your behalf. "Submitting it on your own shows your level of interest in the company. Parents are obsessed with wanting their son or daughter to be successful, but the company wants to know the candidate wants to be successful within the company rather than just their parents." | @mickswasko

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